#8 FolklorePortrait

01_Lidewij-Edelkoort

 Madly in
love with
   nature

Being founder of Bloom magazine - the first artistic magazine to analyse major trends in horticulture – Lidewij Edelkoort can call herself righteous an expert in how to celebrate the beauty of nature. Let’s dive into her luscious mind! A blooming portrait of Li Edelkoort, one of the world’s foremost trend forecasters of our time_______.

Seeing the future

Trend forecasting isn’t as swift as one might think. It’s all about identifying and analyzing future consumer attitudes, lifestyles and economy trends. Reporting on fashion silhouettes, colour predictions, trends in interior design and floral newness. A trend forecaster cannot latterly ‘see the future in a glass bowl’. It’s about seeking out glimmers of new ideas in society, in extant objects (an intriguing fabric, a clever arrangement of objects, an isolated shape, a new colour combination on the street etc.) and either repurpose or recombine these elements to designate a vision.

03 Lidewij Edelkoort
04 Lidewij Edelkoort
0 _Lidewi -Edelkoort
06 Lidewij Edelkoort
07 Lidewij Edelkoort
08 Lidewij Edelkoort

Photography by Liliroze, Amira Fritz, Marie Taillefer and Lucas Golen

09_Lidewij-Edelkoort

Plantcast

Hibiscus, Eustoma, Dahlia, Agapanthus, Cactus, Cordyline, Peony, Ligustrum, Phoenix, Crocosmia, Amaranthus, Strelizia, Tulip

Seeing the future

Trend forecasting isn’t as swift as one might think. It’s all about identifying and analyzing future consumer attitudes, lifestyles and economy trends. Reporting on fashion silhouettes, colour predictions, trends in interior design and floral newness. A trend forecaster cannot latterly ‘see the future in a glass bowl’. It’s about seeking out glimmers of new ideas in society, in extant objects (an intriguing fabric, a clever arrangement of objects, an isolated shape, a new colour combination on the street etc.) and either repurpose or recombine these elements to designate a vision.

“Identifying a trend is a continuous building process, a series of observations– curiosity, mapping, gathering information and intuition. I create a kind of personal archive. Once an idea has reached saturation it just pops up by itself, although it can be triggered by a single image. Trend forecasting is much like archeology as it deals with the gathering and interpreting of fragments of information”, Li Edelkoort explains (red. Designboom). Offering their consulting services to major brands, as well as to smaller independent designers, to say that Edelkoort’s influence is far-reaching would be an understatement. Lidewij’s trend forecast for many product development department’ is ‘the bible’ —the de facto reference for developing new designs, shapes, hues and tweaking package design.

‘AS VULNERABLE GUARDIANS OF THE LAND WE ARE SHARING THE EARTH WITH OUR PLANTS AND TREES_______.’

Humble flower

Lidewij has been named by Time Magazine as one of the Most Influential People. Wall Street Journal writes about her. And so does New York Times. The online design journal Designboom has called her a visionary. Yet, Edelkoort’s impression of herself is much more humble. In an interview with Linda Tischler she said, “People think I am some kind of ‘mystic gypsy’. But what I really do is pay attention. Then I have the nerve to say what I believe.”

09_Lidewij-Edelkoort

Plantcast

Hibiscus, Eustoma, Dahlia, Agapanthus, Cactus, Cordyline, Peony, Ligustrum, Phoenix, Crocosmia, Amaranthus, Strelizia, Tulip

10 Lidewij Edelkoort
11 Lidewij Edelkoort
12 Lidewij Edelkoort
13 Lidewij Edelkoort
14 Lidewij Edelkoort
15 Lidewij Edelkoort

Photography by Liliroze, Roswell and McLean, Jasmin Storch and Ruy Teixeira

Humble flower

Lidewij has been named by Time Magazine as one of the Most Influential People. Wall Street Journal writes about her. And so does New York Times. The online design journal Designboom has called her a visionary. Yet, Edelkoort’s impression of herself is much more humble. In an interview with Linda Tischler she said, “People think I am some kind of ‘mystic gypsy’. But what I really do is pay attention. Then I have the nerve to say what I believe.”

‘AS VULNERABLE GUARDIANS OF THE LAND WE ARE SHARING THE EARTH WITH OUR PLANTS AND TREES_______.’
Portrait of a flower

Portrait of a flower

And so she does. ‘A good portrait opens the soul’, Lidewij Edelkoort states in the opening sentence of her trend notebook for Autumn-Winter 2018/2019. Portraits can even be hidden in a flower. “Flowers have staying power beyond anything else. Flowers are an intrinsic part of portraiture in most cultures. Seen as a symbol, a character or an icon, the flower itself is often the subject of being painted. Framing a face or decorating a décolleté, softly coloured fragrant botanicals behave like furs, feathers or jewellery, embellishing the sitter and bringing a certain natural elegance to the subject at hand. At the edge of a hood, at the hem of a dress or as a scattered motif, the flowers look floating and delicate. Faded hydrangea colours speak late summer, just before the flowers turn to autumn.”

The plant kingdom

Concerning to Edelkoort flowers add an extra dimension to the emotional relation a consumer wants to experience. She created Bloom Magazine in 1998 as a cult publication that has helped forge another view of flowers to the public. Bringing the world of blooms within the larger cultural arena interacting with art, design, food and beauty, she opened windows to a whole new view at nature. From the symbolism of flowers to the seasonal cycles of death and rebirth, from homeopathic beauty treatments to edible blossoms, the plant kingdom is a starting point for much of human experience. Bloom is like a quest for a new understanding of nature. Speaking to all levels of the industry, from hybrid creators to growers, buyers, distributors, retailers and florists, it’s lending horticulture a new voice.

Portrait of a flower

A wild bouquet

“Flowers have been dominating my trend presentations since 1987. That trend is so violent and so strong and so intertwined with fashion, I can never omit it. But flowers do not want to be that beautiful flower anymore. They want to overcome aesthetics. Make everything wilder. Crazier. Bushes and trees become cutting plants, bush leaves want to be put in a vase and cut flowers just want to be planted like bushes. For plants, large palm trees and banana trees also apply. I’m also tired of all the monochrome bouquets. We now want multi-type bouquets as if you have picked them yourselves, just one per kind. And after field bouquets, you may also like forest bouquets. A nice wild bouquet with crazy styling. Flowers do not want to be taken so seriously anymore. Just start combining things that do not belong!”

17 Lidewij Edelkoort
18 Lidewij Edelkoort
19 Lidewij Edelkoort
20 Lidewij Edelkoort

Photography by Rogerio Cavalcanti, Daniel Pipe, Simon Procter and Sabine Pigalle

‘JUST LIKE THE ROMANTICS, PEOPLE ARE AGAIN MADLY IN LOVE WITH NATURE, DWARFED BY ITS MAGNITUDE_______.’

The bliss of plants

Her love of flowers and plants is deeply rooted into her soul. Ever since 1987 flowers played an important rol in her trend presentations. Like a personal form of celebration life, with a highlight in 2012, a presentation in which earth and everything we find here serves as an inspiration source. A manifesto to try to match the beauty and power of nature and to restore respect for it. “An analysis of the Earth and all its components creates a wealth of ideas for translations into shapes, materials and colors. Our relationship with nature will turn into a relationship in which we not only take, but also give and take care for each other. As vulnerable guardians of the land we are sharing the earth with our plants and trees. We experience a deep form of ecology, inclusive of us humans as another endangered species”, she proclaims.

Passionate

Whoever follows her lectures for years, knows Lidewij as an energetic, inspired woman fighting for the good cause. In an almost activist manner, she influences her audience. For nature, for earth with the manifesto ‘Earth matters’ and recently for a new system in fashion. The Anti-Fashion Manifesto. “Everything is getting cheaper, cheaper. ‘They get away with murder’. Yes, I really see it like that. Because clothes are so cheap, cheaper than a croissant. But think of the production chain. Cotton is first sown, then grown, then harvested, combed, spun, knitted, finished, labeled, wrapped, transported, unpacked, steamed and hung in the best situation. How is it possible to deliver so cheaply? If you put the entire chain in a row it’s impossible for clothes to cost just a few euros. The consumer is in love with the low price and not yet able to boycott it. I call for a political minimum price for T-shirts, briefs and so on. This simply can not happen for much longer.”

Transnature

“People are adorn by nature as if it were clothing; we see the plant come to the fore as an important illusion of dressing, embracing the body with its tenacious and enlacing vines. Leaves become sleeves, petals act as bonnets, floral corollas count as skirts and creepers become invasive yet exquisite pieces of jewellery. A Victorian reverie comes to life where the botanical world interferes and a organic lifestyle is in the making”, according to Lidewij Edelkoort. Not only consuming organic goods but also a holistic system of connectivity with an intuitive instinct to survive. “Just like the Romantics, people are again madly in love with nature, dwarfed by its magnitude, silenced by its sounds, belittled by its functioning. Intimately understanding that we depend on each other_______.”

‘JUST LIKE THE ROMANTICS, PEOPLE ARE AGAIN MADLY IN LOVE WITH NATURE, DWARFED BY ITS MAGNITUDE_______.’

The bliss of plants

Her love of flowers and plants is deeply rooted into her soul. Ever since 1987 flowers played an important rol in her trend presentations. Like a personal form of celebration life, with a highlight in 2012, a presentation in which earth and everything we find here serves as an inspiration source. A manifesto to try to match the beauty and power of nature and to restore respect for it. “An analysis of the Earth and all its components creates a wealth of ideas for translations into shapes, materials and colors. Our relationship with nature will turn into a relationship in which we not only take, but also give and take care for each other. As vulnerable guardians of the land we are sharing the earth with our plants and trees. We experience a deep form of ecology, inclusive of us humans as another endangered species”, she proclaims.

Passionate

Whoever follows her lectures for years, knows Lidewij as an energetic, inspired woman fighting for the good cause. In an almost activist manner, she influences her audience. For nature, for earth with the manifesto ‘Earth matters’ and recently for a new system in fashion. The Anti-Fashion Manifesto. “Everything is getting cheaper, cheaper. ‘They get away with murder’. Yes, I really see it like that. Because clothes are so cheap, cheaper than a croissant. But think of the production chain. Cotton is first sown, then grown, then harvested, combed, spun, knitted, finished, labeled, wrapped, transported, unpacked, steamed and hung in the best situation. How is it possible to deliver so cheaply? If you put the entire chain in a row it’s impossible for clothes to cost just a few euros. The consumer is in love with the low price and not yet able to boycott it. I call for a political minimum price for T-shirts, briefs and so on. This simply can not happen for much longer.”

Transnature

“People are adorn by nature as if it were clothing; we see the plant come to the fore as an important illusion of dressing, embracing the body with its tenacious and enlacing vines. Leaves become sleeves, petals act as bonnets, floral corollas count as skirts and creepers become invasive yet exquisite pieces of jewellery. A Victorian reverie comes to life where the botanical world interferes and a organic lifestyle is in the making”, according to Lidewij Edelkoort. Not only consuming organic goods but also a holistic system of connectivity with an intuitive instinct to survive. “Just like the Romantics, people are again madly in love with nature, dwarfed by its magnitude, silenced by its sounds, belittled by its functioning. Intimately understanding that we depend on each other_______.”

Text
Nancy Berendsen

Photography
Special thanks to: Lucas Golen, Daniel Pype, Evan Beth, Jasmin Storch, Milliroze, Marie Taillefer, Rogerio Calvalcanti, Ruy Teixeira, Sabine Pigalle, Simon Procter, Doswell and McLean, Amira Fritz.