#6 Exotique eroticGreen Treasures

Floral
 reveries

Let yourself be amazed and bedazzled by these exquisit and extravagant floral finds_______.

By Angel Trinidad

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Rococo butterfly

Chinoiserie was popularized in Europe during the 18th century due to the rise in trade with China and East Asia, and thus, the fascination of exotic East Asian cultures. Literally meaning “Chinese”, Chinoiserie is the European interpretation of East Asian artistic traditions, especially in the decorative arts. Strongly related to Rococo, both styles put an emphasis on exuberant decoration, asymmetry and subject matters that focus on leisure and pleasure. Chinoiserie wallpaper feature extravagant floral patterns, pagodas and exotic imagery – delicate birds fluttering about luscious blooms, elegant bamboo plants swaying in the wind, a butterfly softly landing on a silver leaf…

Decor Chinois fond Rose by ZUBER, zuber.fr

/img/issue6/green-treasures/01.jpg

Floral
 reveries

Let yourself be amazed and bedazzled by these exquisit and extravagant floral finds_______.

By Angel Trinidad

Rococo butterfly

Chinoiserie was popularized in Europe during the 18th century due to the rise in trade with China and East Asia, and thus, the fascination of exotic East Asian cultures. Literally meaning “Chinese”, Chinoiserie is the European interpretation of East Asian artistic traditions, especially in the decorative arts. Strongly related to Rococo, both styles put an emphasis on exuberant decoration, asymmetry and subject matters that focus on leisure and pleasure. Chinoiserie wallpaper feature extravagant floral patterns, pagodas and exotic imagery – delicate birds fluttering about luscious blooms, elegant bamboo plants swaying in the wind, a butterfly softly landing on a silver leaf…

Decor Chinois fond Rose by ZUBER, zuber.fr

If these walls could talk...

Marie Antoinette (1755-1793), the famous teenage queen of France and wife of Louis XVI, is one of the most fascinating royals who lived in Versailles. Dedicated to the organisation of the court’s entertainments, the queen and her cohorts spent a lot of time in the grand rooms of the palace. The queen loved flowers (among her favorites were irises, hyacinths, tulips, lilacs, lilies, poppies and violets) as seen in the abundance of decorative florals in the royal chambers: from the curtains and wallpapers, to the printed upholstery and bed drapes. Rococo opulence combined with extravagant wall-to-wall floral decoration make for a palace truly fit for an exceptional, history-changing queen.

plays-with-needles.blogspot.com

Overwhelming ode to decoration

A breathtaking shiny and golden ode to fashion and nature with goldplated and shiny petals and gemstones all over. As if Dolce and Gabanna are abundantly celebrating nature’s kingdom where every flower should be higly decorated and treated like a precious queen.

Edited by Michelle Duijn

Forgotten exotic flowers:

These exotic blooms make us dream of new adventures and faraway places that we have yet to discover…
1. The Peruvian lily (Alstroemeria) is native to South America. With stems reaching up to 1.5 metres in height, its beautiful flowers come in many shades of red, orange, green and often flecked with darker colours.
2. The Woolflower or Celosia – which means burning in Ancient Greek – is famous for its fiery colours. It grows on East Africa’s highlands and known under their Swahili name, mfungu.
3.The Kangaroo paw (Anigozanthos) with its tall stalks and vivid, velvety flowers, only grows in dry, sandy regions of Western Australia______.

Illustrated by Edith Rewa

Beyond blooming

These elegant blossoms come from the Ayako Tanaka dry flower arrangement school in Kobe, Japan. Using fresh dry flowers, students learn how to arrange blossoms in an artful and disciplined way, putting an emphasis on shape, line and form. The school is headed by floral arrangement artist Ayako Tanaka, who makes delicate dry flower arrangements that are alluring, calming and inspiring all at the same time. Her pieces evoke peace and tranquility, and prove that a flower’s beauty goes beyond its blooming stage.

atelier-at.com

Happy leaves

Sarah Illenberger’s Wonderplants series feature bright, cheerful leaves decorated with colorful DIY materials. Created during a six-week trip to Portugal as a personal art project, the artist collected leaves and decorated and photographed them using locally available tools. “I wanted to make a project using only the resources that were available, so plants, plus stickers and tape I found in local stationery and hardware stores, were my first choice,” Sarah shares. “Over time, I gathered more leaves from the Botanical Gardens in Porto and Lisbon and applied geometric shapes. They were inspired by Portuguese tiles and African fabrics.”

sarahillenberger.com

 

Art deco oasis

Stepping into Bar Botanique in Amsterdam feels like being transported into a different era altogether: one of romantic grandeur, exotic adventures and luscious dreams. This lush, Art Deco heaven is filled with palms, philodendron, ferns and monstera, complementing its vivid interior of mint green, apricot and gold. The restaurant and bar is open all day for French-Mediterranean lunch, dinner and drinks; an alluring tropical oasis in the middle of the city.

barbotanique.nl

Nature’s meaning

Wow, such beautiful art deco bookcovers, all about flowers! Like this rare Flora Symbolica from 1869, an antique book full of illustrated flowers and their meaning, found in the Commons Collections at the National Library of New Zealand. Or The Life and works of William Blake, or The blue flower by Henry van Dyke… Indulge yourself and cuddle into your favourite readingnook with one of these on your lap.

Impressionistic blooms

Stanley Bielen’s intimate oils feature vivid blossoms and fruits against velvety, lush backgrounds, creating an atmosphere of quiet contemplation. Originally from Poland, he studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He currently lives in Philadelphia and teaches at the Fleisher Art Memorial of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Bielen's work is part of the collections of the Hirshorn Museum, CBS Television and Goldman Sachs. The artist’s paintings have been compared to the late still life’s of Edouard Manet. With loose, rich brushstrokes and simple compositions, Bielen captures the intimate, ethereal side of plants and flowers: bathed in half-light, and enveloped in translucent colors.

stanleybielen.com

Botanic lordship

Thanks to our guys. Allessandro Michel (creative director Gucci) and Dries van Noten we hold personally responsible for all the inspiring floral glory that we are about to see this summer.

Catwalk images: Jeroen Snijders