#5 Golden issueTrendstory

Enchanting Physalis with its womblike husk contains a hidden orange treasure

 Lovely
 golden

Physalis

The humble and endearing Physalis, with its enveloping paper husk and warm colours, is a reminder of our human need to nestle, nurture and come closer together. A tribute to this delicate golden cherry_______.

Image on top: Ray Douglas, next two images and styling: Myriam Balaÿ.

The humble and endearing Physalis, with its enveloping paper husk and warm colours, is a reminder of our human need to nestle, nurture and come closer together. A tribute to this delicate golden cherry_______.

Also known as ground- husk- and golden cherry, the Physalis is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family which grows in warm, temperate regions. Its most striking detail is its large papery husk derived from the calyx, which encloses the yellow-orange fruit, as if in a womb. The fruit is often used in hearty dishes that bring comfort: recipes abound of ground cherry pie, jams, waffles, focaccia and cheesecake. The lantern-like flower is a shining inspiration to past, present and future trends in art, food, interiors and design, and a symbol of society’s ever-human desire to be safe, to feel comfort and to be enclosed and protected.

In Art Nouveau, the warm red-yellow tones and curved shapes of the Physalis is often seen in illustration, art and interior design, particularly in lamp decoration, where the papery husks function as the lamp shade enveloping a yellow, shining bulb. Egon Schiele, the prominent Austrian painter and protege of Gustav Klimt, is noted for his expressive self-portraits, including one with a Physalis.

Also known as ground- husk- and golden cherry, the Physalis is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family which grows in warm, temperate regions. Its most striking detail is its large papery husk derived from the calyx, which encloses the yellow-orange fruit, as if in a womb. The fruit is often used in hearty dishes that bring comfort: recipes abound of ground cherry pie, jams, waffles, focaccia and cheesecake. The lantern-like flower is a shining inspiration to past, present and future trends in art, food, interiors and design, and a symbol of society’s ever-human desire to be safe, to feel comfort and to be enclosed and protected.

In Art Nouveau, the warm red-yellow tones and curved shapes of the Physalis is often seen in illustration, art and interior design, particularly in lamp decoration, where the papery husks function as the lamp shade enveloping a yellow, shining bulb. Egon Schiele, the prominent Austrian painter and protege of Gustav Klimt, is noted for his expressive self-portraits, including one with a Physalis.

Video: Michelle Duijn. Styling: Lidewij Smeur.

Fast-forward to present times, one of the world’s leading trend forecasters, Lidewij Edelkoort, presented the idea of Embryonic as one of the key leading trends in the upcoming years. According to her, ‘we will enter a new state that is still evolving; the dawn of hard to discern directions that are incubating within, waiting to emerge and see the light… The social mood is shifting to a climate of togetherness, of compassion driven by a creative mentality, of softer, gentler manners and an alternative, appeasing period in politics.’ The embryonic aspect of these new trends will be reflected in various industries, characterised by reassuring and comforting style principles. She also mentioned that “all design is spherical – it has an outer skin and an inner core.” Think of: embracing and cuddling the consumers, enveloping environments for interiors and architecture, cocooning details and onion-like layering. Or as Li worded it: ‘the womb of the world awaiting a renaissance’.

Photography: Isolde Woudstra. Styling: Lidewij Smeur.

Did you know?

In Japan, the Physalis alkekengi, also called the golden flower, is used in the Unani system of medicine – a Perso-Arabic traditional system of medicine with roots dating back to the 11th century – as an antiseptic, diuretic and sedative. Its seeds are also used as part of the Bon Festival as offerings to souls. Moreover, an annual market called hōzuki-ichi is dedicated to this flower in the Asakusa region.

She could have been describing the physalis itself, with its naturally spherical design, crisp outer layer and soft golden core. In fact, her predictions have already came true (and is still coming true) as seen in design developments and trends in recent years. Think of Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2015, Marsala – a warm, reddish-copper orange colour – which reflects a more positive sensitivity to the cooler tones of recent years and points to a renewed emphasis on sharing experiences and developing a warm and caring environment for all. More recently, Pantone released a set of colour palettes that will play a big role in 2017, including one called Acquired Taste. Its rich colours bring to mind the Physalis’ characteristic shades: Orange Chiffon, Pale Gold, Mulberry and Brandied Melon.

Photography and styling by Food Bandits. Click here for the recipes.