#2 PlantsUnexpected plants

Court of
Inspiration

Court of
Inspiration

‘Plants offer a feeling of safety and security, of peace and quiet, that embodies a space with a sense of inspiration and happiness____.’

At one with nature

This South Korean photographer creates a style and poetic universe with her own self-image; searching for an equilibrium between childhood and sexuality, between reality and fantasy.

Photography: Ahn Sun Mi

Preserved Green

Inspired by the overgrown subtropical plants in his studio, Stephen created these miniature gems made from glass.

Glass work, by Stephen Bradbourne from Auckland

‘B’

Inspired by different chairs, which were left behind in her favourite woods, Naia took this splendid photo.

Nuevos Territorios, 2010 by Naia del Castillo, colour photography, 80x100 cm

Fairy-tale leaves

One sunny summer day Lorenzo Duran saw a caterpillar eating holes in a leaf. This so inspired him that he immediately removed a leaf and went to work. Using a pair of scissors, he has since created the most delightful miniature cuttings.

Gardenart, by Lorenzo Duran

Flowering fragments

She refers to herself as a real ‘flea market lover’. Sabine Timm makes the most beautiful little artistic gems from the ‘green treasures’ she discovers.

Scherven (Fragments), by Sabine Timm, (40K)

The Leaf Man

One day Azuma Makoto had a dream. He saw a man entirely dressed in leaves, standing still against a white background. He turned that dream into a hilarious photo series of people dressed in leaves.

Leaf man, 2015 by Shiinoki AMKK

No Way

Photographer Naia del Castillo, who is obsessed with our relationship with the natural environment, explores the ways we have altered nature into something figurative.

Entre Flores y Medusas, 2010 by Naia del Castillo. Photo printed on silk with broidery in cotton, 25 X 25 cm

Your plant or your life

A synonym for nature; this magnificent pistol looks simultaneously cruel and poetic.

Harm less, by Sonia Rentsch for The January Biannual. Photography: Albert Comper

Enclosed Garden

These Argentinian ‘green’ fingers prefer working with wool. With it, Alexandra makes incredibly handsome rugs on which you can wander in nature at home. She made her best-known work for the couturier Dries van Noten – the now legendary moss-covered catwalk.

Wool rug, by Alexandra Kehayoglou

Idyllic chair

The assignment: make a piece of furniture from branches, leaves, flowers and plants. Studio Asif Khan accepted the challenge for the Harvest research project and created the most amazing chair.

Harvest, Design Museum 2010, Studio Asif Khan

An organic gem

The Polish jewellery designer, Sylwia Calus, is a nature lover. She works her magic on animals, flowers and plants, transforming them into earrings, rings, and bracelets, such as this adorable moss ring.

Mosring, by Sylwia Calus Design

Branches Dress

With his series, Trompe l’oeil, Ron Isaacs is pulling our leg. Those who would like such a fine green dress will be out of luck. This one is made of wood. Ron calls it his interpretation of his love for the visual world.

Evening, 2013 by Ron Isaacs, acryl on a birch multiplex design, 44 1/2" x 27" x 3 3/4", from the Racine Art Museum collection

Cutting

Hillary uses botanical material such as leaves and branches, which she combines with organic objects with fancywork to provide a link between nature and human beings.

Vinado, by Hillary Fayle. Photography: Markus L. Wise

Fairyland

According to Naia, Nuevos Territorios is a response to our longings for wild, adventurous passion for the unknown in our daily lives.

Nuevos Territorios, 2010 by Naia del Castillo. Photo printed on cotton with aluminium staves, 200 x 210 x 20 cm

Bamboozle

Overgrown climbing plants regularly provide inspiration for young artists around the world, changing bland walls or pavements into striking works of art, like this one.

Streetart, unknown source

Fairyland

According to Naia, Nuevos Territorios is a response to our longings for wild, adventurous passion for the unknown in our daily lives.

Nuevos Territorios, 2010 by Naia del Castillo. Photo printed on cotton with aluminium staves, 200 x 210 x 20 cm

Text and compilation
Rosanne Loffeld
Lidewij Smeur