#2 PlantsMuse

Flirting
ferns

Flirting
ferns

Flirting
ferns

The fern was a muse in Victorian times. And we have got news, the ‘fern craze’ is back.

Lady
feathers

Facts &
Ferns

Varia

Like
a bird

Fern
mania

Maarten
Kolk

Maarten
Kolk

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Lady
feathers

Lady
feathers

Botanical experts have revealed that psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) suffered from pteridophobia, a morbid fear of ferns (‘pteris’ is Greek for fern, from Greek ‘pteron’ meaning feather). Well, what a shame. If only he could see how ladies are enchanted by these feathers...

Styling: Lidewij Smeur (www.lidewijsmeur.nl), Photography: Sanne van Rozendaal (www.szanne.com).

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#2 PlantsMuse

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“Ferns will grow where flowering plants would perish” - Francis George Heath (1876)

Good
taste

The fate of the fern has changed. Just like in the Victorian days ferns are seen as ‘good taste’. We’re obsessed.

Styling: Petra de Valk Concept Design + Styling. Photography: Tjitske Photography. Ferns by raadscheldersvarens.nl."

“Ferns will grow where flowering plants would perish” - Francis George Heath (1876)

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Like
a bird

Is it a bird? A human? Or a fern? Photographer Tjitske van Leeuwen shows an alienating fairy tale.

Styling: Petra de Valk Concept Design + Styling. Photography: Tjitske Photography + Motion Represented by Paige, Unit (www.unit.nl). Video: Video and picture, Wings, to idea of Studio H, Tilly Hazenberg. The curl ferns are brought to you by: Raadschelders Varenkwekerij, De Kwakel (www.raadscheldersvarens.nl).

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Flirting
ferns

It is almost magical to see the little brown knobs of a fern budding and getting a little further into the sunlight as she rolls out her tender bright green babyleaves, already flirting quite sophisticallywith the warm beams of sunlight...

Fern mania

The fern as was once so popular as a muse that there is a whole time period in 1860 named after it: 'Fern Craze' in Victorian times. Back than pteridomaniacs risked life and limb in search of exotic, new species on rock faces in Arizona and in the swamps of New Zealand. A frenzy of fern aficionados were scrambling over the different and exotic species of fern. Fern motifs were seen everywhere; on glass, porcelain, curtains and wallpaper, in crafts, decorative tiles and even on wrought iron chairs and benches for the garden. The fern motifs were seen for the first time during the world exhibition in 1862 and remained popular 'as a symbol of pleasant pursuits' to the beginning of the last century. Not a plant to underestimate.

Text by Angel Trinidad. Illustration by Ilona Gerretsen Barata

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Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters exhibited their work among others at Sotheby’s London. Maarten Kolk and Guus Kusters both graduated cum laude from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Together they develop autonomous projects and work as exhibition designers and curators. The poetry they find in nature is the foundation of their work.

Elegant dancer in the wind

‘The individual twigs of ferns are really stunning, they caught our attention immediately. Each sprig is so different and breathes elegance’. Need we say more? Enjoy these green dancers by Studio Maarten Kolk and Guus Kusters.

Concept and photography: Maarten Kolk and Guus Kusters

Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters exhibited their work among others at Sotheby’s London. Maarten Kolk and Guus Kusters both graduated cum laude from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Together they develop autonomous projects and work as exhibition designers and curators. The poetry they find in nature is the foundation of their work.