#13 IconsHistoric Beauty

Luscious
 lilac

The palette of iconic lilacs and golden tones in this beautiful Iris painting from Sir Cedric Morris fueled the inspiration of successful photographer Mathilde Karrèr. Enjoy her interpretation of this English masterpiece especially created for The Green Gallery_______.

02 Mathilde Karrèr

Iris seedlings – Sir Cedric Morris (1889 – 1982)

03 Mathilde Karrèr

Iris seedlings – Sir Cedric Morris (1889 – 1982)

04 Mathilde Karrèr

Inspiration

Mathilde: “The role of a single flower species is prominent in this painting: the iconic bearded iris. For me personally a very mysterious flower. However not in season... (her next of kin the common blue Iris was). I wanted to use the same philosophy as the painter: work with one kind of form. I choose a more vertical form instead of the beautiful whimsical shape of an iris. However, the color range of the flowers used, corresponds to the original. The frame, is it a frame or a window? Made me wonder, where are we? Why is there a golden room? Which dimension is outside? Dissecting the image in these elements, I then used these, so called parts, as ingredients to create a new world.”

“I FIND IT FASCINATING TO STUDY NATURAL PROCESSES. ASKING MYSELF WHY A SEED POD LOOKS LIKE IT DOES_______.”
08 Mathilde Karrèr

Who is Mathilde Karrèr

Mathilde Karrèr’s earmark is to use accessories, flowers and food to create lavish yet subtle compositions with a captivating narrative. Half-way between paintings and movie stills, her photographs are elaborate, visually-rich micro worlds with knowingly chosen details. Her distinct, expressive and sharply defined aesthetic has been sought by commercial clients such as Montblanc, Ace & Tate and Nike, editorial work can be found in Buffalo Zine, Vogue Netherlands and Highsnobiety.

05 Mathilde Karrèr
06 Mathilde Karrèr
07 Mathilde Karrèr
09 Mathilde Karrèr

Flower cast

Delphinium
Anthurium
Dahlia

The natural world

Mathilde: “Nature an sich has always been a great inspiration to me. The forms, the colours... I find it fascinating to study natural processes. Why a seed pod looks like it does, how flowers grow from a bud into full in bloom untill decay sets in. How some flowers are constructed in a particular way to attract bees (and humans).
In Japan one practices something called forest bathing, or shinrin- yoku. Shinrin in Japanese means “forest” and yoku means “bath.” So shinrin-yoku means bathing in the forest atmosphere, or taking in the forest through your senses. By opening your senses, it bridges the gap between us and the natural world. I think that makes a lot of sense. I find cities also very inspirational, however one needs the natural world above all, I believe_______.”

Mathildes favourites:

Mathilde: “It changes every season. However the bearded Iris I find very special.”

10 Mathilde Karrèr

Sir Cedric Morris
(1889 – 1982)

Sir Cedric Morris was a talented British painter, art teacher and plantsman, best known for his portraits, landscapes and flower paintings. Morris lived in Cornwall, where he studied plants and painted them in water colors. He loved to walk the fields searching for softer color variants of poppies and grew about a thousand new Iris seedlings each year, many carried the prefix Benton named after his beloved pet cat.

Text
Rosanne Loffeld

Photographs
Mathilde Karrèr

Video music
Moments in Love, edit. The Art of Noise, 1984

Self portrait
Cedric Morris, 1930 National Portrait Gallery London

08 Mathilde Karrèr

Who is Mathilde Karrèr

Mathilde Karrèr’s earmark is to use accessories, flowers and food to create lavish yet subtle compositions with a captivating narrative. Half-way between paintings and movie stills, her photographs are elaborate, visually-rich micro worlds with knowingly chosen details. Her distinct, expressive and sharply defined aesthetic has been sought by commercial clients such as Montblanc, Ace & Tate and Nike, editorial work can be found in Buffalo Zine, Vogue Netherlands and Highsnobiety.

“I FIND IT FASCINATING TO STUDY NATURAL PROCESSES. ASKING MYSELF WHY A SEED POD LOOKS LIKE IT DOES_______.”

The natural world

Mathilde: “Nature an sich has always been a great inspiration to me. The forms, the colours... I find it fascinating to study natural processes. Why a seed pod looks like it does, how flowers grow from a bud into full in bloom untill decay sets in. How some flowers are constructed in a particular way to attract bees (and humans).
In Japan one practices something called forest bathing, or shinrin- yoku. Shinrin in Japanese means “forest” and yoku means “bath.” So shinrin-yoku means bathing in the forest atmosphere, or taking in the forest through your senses. By opening your senses, it bridges the gap between us and the natural world. I think that makes a lot of sense. I find cities also very inspirational, however one needs the natural world above all, I believe_______.”

Mathildes favourites:

Mathilde: “It changes every season. However the bearded Iris I find very special.”

Text
Rosanne Loffeld

Photographs
Mathilde Karrèr

Video music
Moments in Love, edit. The Art of Noise, 1984

Self portrait
Cedric Morris, 1930 National Portrait Gallery London

09 Mathilde Karrèr

Flower cast

Delphinium
Anthurium
Dahlia

10 Mathilde Karrèr

Sir Cedric Morris
(1889 – 1982)

Sir Cedric Morris was a talented British painter, art teacher and plantsman, best known for his portraits, landscapes and flower paintings. Morris lived in Cornwall, where he studied plants and painted them in water colors. He loved to walk the fields searching for softer color variants of poppies and grew about a thousand new Iris seedlings each year, many carried the prefix Benton named after his beloved pet cat.